Women doctors’ purses as an unrecognized fomite

RESULTS:
We observed that nine of 13 doctors’ purses were colonized with bacteria compared with two of 14 controls.
CONCLUSIONS:
This statistically significant finding demonstrates that there is a potential for a doctor’s purse to serve as a vector for disease transmission. It is prudent for women health care workers to be aware that their purses may be a source of bacterial contamination. We, therefore, recommend that women practitioners use appropriate infection control measures whenever their purses are in the health care environment.

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A study to investigate the importance of purses as fomites

BACKGROUND:
Purses hardly get washed and are discarded, mostly, when they are no longer usable. This study aims to investigate whether women’s and men’s purses can serve as fomites.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
A total of 145 purses from 80 women and 65 men were swabbed and cultured. The bacteria were identified by gram staining and with the standard biochemical tests.
RESULTS:
A total of 138 purses (95.2%) showed bacterial contamination, out of which 49.4% had a single growth and 50.7% had mixed growth. The material of the purse was found to affect bacterial growth. Synthetic purses showed higher mean colony-forming unit (CFU) counts (P < 0.05).

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